Atlantic Australia Proprietary Limited is in hot water after making misleading claims about the energy efficiency of its hot water balloons.

Carys Monteath / Stuff

Atlantic Australia Proprietary Limited is in hot water after making misleading claims about the energy efficiency of its hot water balloons.

A second hot water balloon company is accused of making misleading claims about its energy efficiency.

The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA) alleges that in 2019 Atlantic Australia Proprietary, which sold bottles from the Steatite Premium range, declared the bottles to be the most energy efficient storage water heater on the market, on its website.

But he said test reports for the four-cylinder models showed they did not meet fuel efficiency regulations.

The EECA checks whether devices meet minimum energy performance standards and labeling requirements, as well as energy efficiency declarations from manufacturers and suppliers.

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EECA chief executive Andrew Caseley said an investigation into the allegations led to the EECA taking legal action on the grounds that the allegations about the fuel performance of the cylinders were false or misleading.

“Lawsuits are a last resort for the EECA because our preference is to work with industry,” he said.

“However, this issue is significant because hot water accounts for around 30% of the average energy bill and regulatory failure is a long-term cost to households.

“It is also a matter of fairness for suppliers who comply with the regulations.”

In the first court appearance, the Atlantic Australia Proprietary charge was adjourned to December 2 for a review hearing in the Lower Hutt District Court.

This is the second continuation of the EECA.

Last December, electric hot water tank maker Superheat was convicted and fined $ 9,900 after pleading guilty to failing to comply with energy efficiency regulations.

In 2020, the authority tested 12 models of electric hot water balloons sold in New Zealand and found that half of them did not meet efficiency standards set out in law.

Testing resulted in the withdrawal of four models from sale.

Caseley said 73,000 electric hot water balloons were sold in New Zealand last year and that plumbers and the public are depending on claims from importers and manufacturers about the energy efficiency of hot water tanks.

“Electric hot water tanks are the most popular choice for New Zealand homes to heat water, but tend to be an emergency purchase, which means homeowners often don’t have the time. to make a thoughtful decision. “

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